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Cape Town to Vic Falls via Namibia - Game parks and sites

Zimbabwe & Zambia - Victoria Falls

The Zambezi River drops 100 metres over a mile wide chasm creating one of the most incredible natural wonders of the world. When the river is in full flow, the water roars and sends a cloud of spray 500 metres into the air. Victoria Falls is on the border of Zimbabwe (Victoria Town) and Zambia (Livingstone).  Adventure activities here are; bungee jumping, white water rafting, game-viewing on horseback, canoeing, light aircraft or helicopter flights over the falls and the sunset cruise on the Zambezi, walk with lion cubs.

Namibia - Cape Cross Seal Colony

Namibian Atlantic Coast. This is where the first European explorers landed in the 15th century. It is now more famous for the seal breeding colony. It might not smell great, but the sight of so many Cape Fur Seals is quite impressive. The scene varies from season to season. Certain times males are fighting for mates. Pupping season brings not only adorable seal pups but ravenous jackal taking advantage of the weak newborns or, as they see them, easy meals. Cape Fur Seals are really a type of sea lion only found along the coast of Southern Africa.

Botswana - Chobe Park

All our Southern Africa regional trips include a boat cruise on the Chobe River with an optional game drive. Chobe National Park is the second largest national park in Botswana covering 10,500 square kilometres, with the greatest concentrations of game found in African. The park is divided into four distinctly different eco systems: Serondela with its lush plains and dense forests in the Chobe River area in the extreme north-east; the Savuti Marsh in the west about fifty kilometres north of Mababe gate; the Linyanti Swamps in the north-west and the hot dry hinterland in between. Chobe’s elephants are the largest surviving continuous elephant population which range over  northern Botswana and the northwest of  Zimbabwe, over 120,000 strong. The Chobe elephant are migratory, making seasonal movements of up to 200 kilometres from the Chobe and Linyanti rivers, where they concentrate in the dry season, to the pans in the southeast of the park, to which they disperse in the rains.

Namibia - Etosha Pan National Park

Namibia’s Etosha pan is a large salt pan, forming part of the Kalahari Basin .The dry lakebed is 120-kilometers long (75-miles). During the day we drive through the park in the truck to various water holes where animals may congregate. We may see elephants, rhino, lion, leopard, springbok, oryx, kudu, mongoose, and even the elusive giraffe and zebra. In the evening, walk from the campsite to the illuminated waterhole, it’s very busy with animals coming to drink especially in the dry season.

Namibia - Kamanjab Cheetah Park

Kamanjab, Namibia. Cheetahs are a threat to livestock which is a major industry in the area. Farmers and ranchers will often kill this endangered animal when one is suspected of taking down cattle, goat, or sheep. The family that runs the Cheetah Farm doesn’t like to see that happen and instead catches problem animals and releases them onto their expansive but enclosed property thereby saving the cheetahs and the livelihood of local ranchers. You can pet and play with the tame cheetahs up at the ranch house. In the afternoon, ride out to the fields to see the cats feed.

Orange River

The river forms the border with South Africa. You can spend the afternoon canoeing on the river.

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